Showing posts with label beer. Show all posts
Showing posts with label beer. Show all posts

April 30, 2014

Chili with Beer

Some might call this boilermaker chili. Some might call it tailgate chili. Those two names conjure up different meanings for me, especially concerning their list of ingredients, so I simply named this chili with beer.

Like all tomato sauces, this is better as leftovers, though still incredible the day of. The longer it simmers, the better it'll be too. Enjoy!

Chili with Beer

Yield: 8 servings
Ingredients
  • 1.5 pounds ground meat (can be anything with or without sausage)
  • 1/2 pound dried beans, soaked overnight, sprouted if desired
  • 1 28 oz can diced tomatoes with juice
  • 1/2 6 oz can tomato paste
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 2 celery stalks, sliced
  • 1 carrot, sliced
  • 1 green bell pepper, seeded and chopped
  • 1 red bell pepper, seeded and chopped
  • 2 small cubes of beef bouillon
  • 1/2 cup beer
  • 2 tablespoons chili powder
  • 1.5 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 1.5 teaspoons garlic, minced
  • 1.5 teaspoons dried oregano
  • 1 teaspoon cumin
  • 1 teaspoon hot sauce
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried basil
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon paprika
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
Cooking Directions
  1. Heat a large pot over medium-high heat. Cook and crumble the ground meat into the hot pan until evenly browned. Drain off fat.
  2. Stir in the soaked beans, diced tomatoes, and tomato paste.
  3. Stir in the onion, celery, green and red bell peppers, bouillon, and beer.
  4. Stir in chili powder, Worcestershire sauce, garlic, oregano, cumin, hot sauce, basil, black pepper, cayenne, paprika, and salt.
  5. Stir together, then cover and simmer over low heat for at least 2 hours, stirring occasionally.
  6. After 2 hours, taste and adjust salt, pepper, and chili powder as desired. The longer it cooks, the better it'll taste. It'll also get better when refrigerated like most tomato sauce-based dishes.

August 28, 2013

Spent Grain Sandwich Bread


When you have leftover spent grains from that wonderful batch of home brew, here's exactly what you should do with it. Sure, you could throw it out, feed it to your pets, add it to your fertilizer, or make porridge with it. But that's not as much fun. So take a little time and make the tastiest spent grain bread ever. Enjoy!


Spent Grain Sandwich Bread

Yield: 1 loaf
Ingredients
  • 1 cup spent grain, drained
  • 300 g warm water
  • 200 g white flour
  • 200 g whole wheat flour
  • 25 g canola oil
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 tsp yeast
Cooking Directions
  1. In a stand mixer or large bowl, mix the water, spent grain, canola oil, and yeast.
  2. Let sit for 5 minutes.
  3. Add the salt and mix.
  4. Add the flour and mix until uniform. (The dough will be too wet to knead by hand.)
  5. Cover with a kitchen towel, plastic wrap, or foil for 2 hours. The dough will rise considerably and then flatten on top.
  6. Oil a loaf pan. Using either wet hands or by flouring the surface of the dough and your hands, fold the dough under itself inwards two to four times and place in the pan.
  7. Let rise until doubled, about 30-45 minutes.
  8. Bake at 350 F for 1 hour.
  9. Remove from oven and let sit in the pan for 5 minutes before removing from pan and let it cool on a rack. Do not cut into it until it has cooled completely.

August 21, 2013

Belgian White Ale (Wit) - Boil in a Bag


For all you Boil in a Bag (BIAB) fanatics, here's a recipe I adapted from various others. BIAB is currently my favorite way to brew, and I can't recommend it enough. This Belgian white ale is delicious, probably the best beer I've ever brewed. As you can see, it's got great color and that thick head and long retention is due to the wheat.

It tastes like a better Hoegaarden or Blue Moon and a less-spiced Allagash White. Mellow and completely drinkable on any day of the year, especially a warm summer day. Next time, I may increase the ginger to give it a bit more kick. It's the kind of beer you dream of to quench your thirst and just want to relax. Enjoy!


Belgian White Ale (Wit) - Boil in a Bag

Yield: 5 gallons
Ingredients
  • 5 lbs Belgian pilsner 2-row
  • 3 lbs flaked wheat (unmalted)
  • 1 lb wheat malt
  • 0.6 oz Saaz hops (8.2% AA)
  • 3/4 oz coriander, broken with a rolling pin
  • 1/2 oz dried sweet orange
  • 1/4 oz dried bitter orange
  • 1 g ground ginger
  • 1 packet Belgian Witbier Yeast (Wyeast 3944)
  • 113 g corn sugar, for priming
Cooking Directions
  1. Line the kettle with the mesh bag. Heat 3 gallons of water to 160 F. Turn off burner.
  2. Slowly add the grist (crushed grain) to the mesh bag, immersed in the water. Stir well to mix, breaking up any clumps of grist.
  3. Mash at 152 °F for 75 minutes. Cover and let rest.
  4. While stirring, raise to 168 F. Hold for 10 minutes. Drain bag in fermenter bucket.
  5. Boil for 60 mins. Add all but 2 or 3 hops pellets at 60 mins, then the 2 or 3 pellets at knockout. Add coriander and orange peel at knockout.
  6. Cool the wort in ice bath in the sink to approximately 100 F.
  7. While the wort cools, sanitize the fermenting equipment – fermenter, lid, fermentation lock, hydrometer, etc – along with the yeast pack and a pair of scissors.
  8. Pour the cooled wort into your fermenter. Leave any thick sludge in the bottom of the kettle.
  9. Add cold water as needed to bring the volume to 5 gallons. Aerate the wort.
  10. Measure specific gravity of the wort with a hydrometer and record.
  11. Add yeast once the temperature of the wort is 78°F or lower (not warm to the touch). Use the sanitized scissors to cut off a corner of the yeast pack, and carefully pour the yeast into the primary fermenter.
  12. Seal the fermenter. Add approximately 1 tablespoon of water to the sanitized fermentation lock. Insert the lock into rubber stopper or lid, and seal the fermenter.
  13. Hold in primary fermenter for 14 days at 69 °F (21 °C).
  14. Bottling
  15. Boil corn sugar in 16 oz water. Pour into fermenter and gently mix. Wait 15 minutes then fill and cap bottles.
  16. Allow to carbonate and age for 14 days.

June 15, 2011

Spent Grain Veggie Burger


The same spent grains that were used to make the Liquid Oatmeal Cookie (Oatmeal Stout), the Spent Grain Bread, and the Spent Grain Muffins, are now being used in their greatest concoction yet - Spent Grain Veggie Burgers.


With the help of black beans and the flavors of soy sauce, garlic, and cumin, the most unique homemade veggie burger is born!

The ease with which this recipe comes together is so simple and only adds to the joy of savoring every bite. Enjoy!

Spent Grain Veggie Burger

Yield: 4 burgers
Ingredients
  • 1/2 cup chopped onion, divided into two
  • 1/2 cup spent grain, wet
  • 1 1/2 cups black beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 2 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 3/4 teaspoon cumin
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper
Cooking Directions
  1. Cook half of onion with a dash of salt in a splash of water in a small pan over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until golden, 5 to 7 minutes. Add spent grain and cook, covered, over low heat 5 to 8 minutes. Transfer to a bowl and stir in beans and soy sauce.
  2. Mash or food process spent grain mixture mixture, garlic, cumin, salt, pepper, and remaining onion until finely chopped.
  3. Form rounded 1/2 cups of mixture into 4 (3 1/2-inch-diameter) patties. Chill at least 10 minutes.
  4. Spray oil in a heavy skillet over medium heat, then cook patties, carefully turning once, about 8 minutes total.

May 13, 2011

Spent Grain Chocolate Breadless Bread Pudding (Muffins)


It's a confusing title, I know. But it's so very accurate! They might be called muffins in another life, yet the way they turn out with their soft, moist inside and their firm outside is more reminiscent of a bread pudding cup.

Except they're breadless bread pudding cups.


Oh, and to make it even more absolutely, flabbergastingly, astonishingly delicious, these puppies (cuppies?) are made with a heaping healthy helping of spent grain left over from brewing a wonderful batch of an oatmeal stout. If you're out of spent grain, try oats and/or any other hearty grain you have.


Enjoy!

Spent Grain Chocolate Breadless Bread Pudding (Muffins)

Yield: 12
Ingredients
  • 4 tablespoons butter, melted
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 cup milk
  • 3/4 cup flour
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 3/4 cup spent grain, wet
  • 1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
Cooking Directions
  1. Heat oven to 350 F.
  2. In a medium bowl, combine the butter, eggs, milk, and then spent grain.
  3. In a separate bowl, mix all remaining ingredients.
  4. Add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients, mix until just combined, and pour into a lined muffin or loaf pan.
  5. Bake 30 minutes for muffins, 50 for a loaf.

May 04, 2011

Spent Grain Bread


Love bread? (Heck yeah!) Love a really hearty bread? (You know it!)

Love beer? (Are you kidding me!) Homebrew? (I've dabbled.)

Want to use those spent grains instead of just throwing them out? I mean you could feed them to livestock or grow mushrooms or even make a kind of spent grain granola. But forget that! Let's make the best damn homemade bread ever with it!


Homemade bread. Is there anything more wholesome? Is there anything that gives you such a feeling of accomplishment? And it feeds you for days!

One of the most important things is to make sure you have enough yeast and that it's still alive. And let the dough rise and double completely - even if it takes 4 hours. This will make for a lighter, airier bread. Enjoy!

Spent Grain Bread

Yield: 2 loaves
Ingredients
  • 3 cups spent grain, wet
  • 1/4 cup warm water
  • 1 tablespoon yeast
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 3-5 cups flour (as needed)
  • dash salt
Cooking Directions
  1. Proof yeast in mixture of water and sugar (make a starter) for 45 minutes to one hour.
  2. Put spent grain in large mixer bowl and add salt. Mix in starter, and start adding flour one cup at a time to start.
  3. Keep adding flour until the dough is smooth and no longer sticky (very important).
  4. Place dough in a large bowl, cover with a clean towel, and let rise until doubled. Then punch down dough.
  5. Form into a round or oblong loaf and place on cookie sheet with a thin layer of corn meal under the loaf.
  6. Allow loaf to double in size, bake in 375 F oven 50 to 60 minutes until browned and the loaf sounds hollow when tapped on the bottom.
  7. Let cool before cutting.
  8. Another option is to separate the dough into two loaves after it is smooth and no longer sticky. It can be baked in bread pans more easily this way.

November 30, 2010

Spent Grain Bread


Love bread? (Heck yeah!) Love a really hearty bread? (You know it!)

Love beer? (Are you kidding me!) Homebrew? (I've dabbled.)

Want to use those spent grains instead of just throwing them out? I mean you could feed them to livestock or grow mushrooms or even make a kind of spent grain granola. But forget that! Let's make the best damn homemade bread ever with it!


Homemade bread. Is there anything more wholesome? Is there anything that gives you such a feeling of accomplishment? And it feeds you for days!

One of the most important things is to make sure you have enough yeast and that it's still alive. And let the dough rise and double completely - even if it takes 4 hours. This will make for a lighter, airier bread. Enjoy!


Spent Grain Bread

Yield: 1 loaf
Ingredients
  • 3 cups spent grain, wet
  • 1/5 cup warm water
  • 1 tablespoon yeast
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 3-5 cups flour (as needed)
  • dash salt
Cooking Directions
  1. Proof yeast in mixture of water and sugar (make a starter) for 45 minutes to one hour.
  2. Put spent grain in large mixer bowl and add salt. Mix in starter, and start adding flour one cup at a time to start.
  3. Keep adding flour until the dough is smooth and no longer sticky (very important).
  4. Place dough in a large bowl, cover with a clean towel, and let rise until doubled. Then punch down dough.
  5. Form into a round or oblong loaf and place on cookie sheet with a thin layer of corn meal under the loaf.
  6. Allow loaf to double in size, bake in 375 F oven 30 to 40 minutes until browned and the loaf sounds hollow when tapped on the bottom.
  7. Let cool before cutting.
  8. Another option is to separate the dough into two loaves after it is smooth and no longer sticky. It can be baked in bread pans more easily this way.

June 21, 2010

Homebrew West Coast Pale Ale


This is my first ever homebrew. I'm such a proud father. This must be what it feels like to have a child come into the world.



Anyway, I got a Mr. Beer kit for insanely cheap (like $10) and pumped out 2.5 gallons of West Coast Pale Ale over 6 weeks. 2 weeks of fermenting, 2 weeks of bottle conditioning, and 2 weeks of in-the-fridge conditioning. It's called the 2-2-2 method or something. Works like a charm. The brew came out slightly sweeter than I would've thought, but the flavor is crispy and refreshing.

I highly recommend trying it if you can find it for such a low price. I'm not going to use any of their other mixes; instead, I'm going to venture out on my own but still use their kit equipment. I'll be making a Newcastle clone soon and then an Oatmeal Stout. I can't wait!

Anyone else ever brew their own beer? Tips, tricks, suggestions?

May 21, 2010

Stove Top Beer Bread

So I'm having a brewski the other night and decide to experiment with the last of it by making a beer bread. How cool, I thought.


But then I didn't want to wait around for it to bake or anything like that as is traditionally done, so I ventured onto the internet in search of something that could be made on the stove instead. Then I came across this Stove Top Beer Bread from Cut Out + Keep - huzzah! Theirs comes out much more like a biscuit (which is what I was intending), and mine came out more like Beer Bread Pancakes.


Still delicious with a hint of beer and with the dash of thyme and rosemary, it really developed an intense flavor the next day. So I did what anyone would do in this situation (right?) and topped my little beer breadies with some sunflower seed butter and had at a couple.

Now you may be wondering...does beer bread go with beer? My answer: does anything not go with beer? Enjoy!